What you Reading at the mo?

The place to talk about off topic, non-Cardiacs related stuff and topics that do not belong in another forum.

Moderator: The Alternate Consultant

User avatar
drterror666
Cardiacs Expert
Posts: 1012
Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 16:38
Location: Bristol, UK

Re: What you Reading at the mo?

Postby drterror666 » Tue Jul 23, 2013 15:50

I'm reading Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier. It's bloody good! 8)
Hello little doggy,
My, you are a nice dog,
What did you just say then?
You could do some tricks! Oh, good, then will you show me?
My word that's a good one!
Would you like a cigarette?
No you can't, they're bad for you!

Image

Batesy
"Dirty Boy Batesy"
Posts: 2284
Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 11:38

Re: What you Reading at the mo?

Postby Batesy » Wed Jul 24, 2013 14:53

drterror666 wrote:I'm reading Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier. It's bloody good! 8)


Yep, absolutely LOVED that book - I recently dug it out to read it again at some point. Have you read anything else by her? Jamaica Inn is brilliant too, as are her short stories.

I recently downloaded the entire works of H.G. Wells for a mere 77p so I'm working my way through them at the moment. I'd already read and loved The Time Machine, War of the Worlds and The Invisible Man. Reading The First Men in the Moon at the moment - it's much funnier (from a 21st century perspective) than he probably intended it to be. At one point, preparing to go to the moon, they decide to wear their flannels and take a blanket, just in case.

User avatar
drterror666
Cardiacs Expert
Posts: 1012
Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 16:38
Location: Bristol, UK

Re: What you Reading at the mo?

Postby drterror666 » Thu Jul 25, 2013 11:56

I've nearly finished the book now. Really, really good stuff. My wife has just finished Jamaica Inn, so I'll read that at some point. She's also got a short story collection called The Doll which she keeps waxing lyrical about. I have a feeling I may be reading quite a lot of du Maurier in the future.

I put together, cough, my own collected works of H.P. Lovecraft. I've now got every story he ever wrote or co-wrote; 111 tales, both big and small, weighing in at 930 pages using 11pt Times New Roman!!! Now, how will I ever print this tome out???
Hello little doggy,
My, you are a nice dog,
What did you just say then?
You could do some tricks! Oh, good, then will you show me?
My word that's a good one!
Would you like a cigarette?
No you can't, they're bad for you!

Image

User avatar
schlep
Cardiacsy
Posts: 4650
Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2006 14:07
Location: a shed in Richmond

Re: What you Reading at the mo?

Postby schlep » Mon Aug 05, 2013 20:56

Funny I was just looking at Rebecca in a bookstore last week and wondering if it's good...I have another book by her, about Cornwall. (I think we were talking about that here, a few years ago!)

I'm reading a funny old SF by Jack Vance "Planet of Adventure" - a trilogy, I'm currently on volume two, "Servants of the Wankh". What.
Do you know what I mean to say
I meant to say to you today
A day goes by I try thats why
I try to speak to you today

User avatar
drterror666
Cardiacs Expert
Posts: 1012
Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 16:38
Location: Bristol, UK

Re: What you Reading at the mo?

Postby drterror666 » Tue Aug 06, 2013 16:24

schlep wrote:"Servants of the Wankh"


:eeeek: :lol:
Hello little doggy,
My, you are a nice dog,
What did you just say then?
You could do some tricks! Oh, good, then will you show me?
My word that's a good one!
Would you like a cigarette?
No you can't, they're bad for you!

Image

User avatar
clippa
Cardiacs Expert
Posts: 4603
Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 16:24

Re: What you Reading at the mo?

Postby clippa » Fri Aug 16, 2013 20:04

Read the first page of this, all feels too ghoulish for me to carry on but if you can get over that, it might be interesting.

http://martinmanleylifeanddeath.com/home_page

User avatar
Snardbafulator
Cardiacs Expert
Posts: 1807
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 23:22
Location: A little house by the Whole World Window

Re: What you Reading at the mo?

Postby Snardbafulator » Wed Sep 25, 2013 17:52

I'm looking very forward to the incipient purchase of Thomas Pynchon's brand new 9/11 novel, Bleeding Edge. I've been a Pynchon fan my entire life and have just scoured & devoured 23 pages of google for the early reviews. Mostly positive, though some serious hate from Michiko Kakutani and The Wall Street Journal. Hey, with enemies like those, who needs blurbs? :lol:

Here's a decent (and more representative) one from Jonathan Lethem in the NY Times.

To Batesy and drterror666: I've read du Maurier's My Cousin Rachel a bazillion years ago and recall liking it at the time (and the English countryside it evokes) but not much else about it.

Bob
Last edited by Snardbafulator on Fri Sep 27, 2013 19:33, edited 1 time in total.
Deconstructing conventional wisdom since the birth of punk

User avatar
drterror666
Cardiacs Expert
Posts: 1012
Joined: Sun Feb 18, 2007 16:38
Location: Bristol, UK

Re: What you Reading at the mo?

Postby drterror666 » Thu Sep 26, 2013 11:30

Du Maurier rocks, as does Katherine Mansfield! But in a different way.

I just read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Phillip K. Dick. Loved it, especially the class / animal stuff, which didn't make it into Blade Runner.

Oh, and I also just read The Complete Ro-Busters. Gotta be done...
Hello little doggy,
My, you are a nice dog,
What did you just say then?
You could do some tricks! Oh, good, then will you show me?
My word that's a good one!
Would you like a cigarette?
No you can't, they're bad for you!

Image

User avatar
Snardbafulator
Cardiacs Expert
Posts: 1807
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 23:22
Location: A little house by the Whole World Window

Re: What you Reading at the mo?

Postby Snardbafulator » Thu Sep 26, 2013 14:45

drterror666 wrote:Du Maurier rocks, as does Katherine Mansfield! But in a different way.

My memory betrays me once again. Cornwall, not England. I had no idea du Maurier wrote The Birds. The Hitchcock movie scared the crap out of me when I saw it on TV as a kid ...
I just read Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Phillip K. Dick. Loved it, especially the class / animal stuff, which didn't make it into Blade Runner.

The movie's supposed to be a classic. I've never seen it, nor have I read any PK Dick (or much sci-fi in general save for a little Arthur C. Clarke and Ursula K. LeGuin, and a bunch of stories from the so-called Golden Age; PK Dick came later.) Hell, I've never read any William Gibson, either, and Pynchon is supposed to be channeling him in his new book. Which is ironic because Pynchon is considered the godfather of cyberpunk / techno-lit and a huge influence on Gibson.

Movie versions tend to give fans of the book heartburn. I'm waiting with anxious trepidation for Paul Thomas Anderson's film, currently in production, of Pynchon's Inherent Vice. Joaquin Phoenix's near-autistic character in PTA's The Master (about the early days of Scientology) doesn't give me much faith he'd make anything like a decent Doc Sportello ...
Oh, and I also just read The Complete Ro-Busters. Gotta be done...

Wikipedia is never more than a few clicks away, but I'll ask anyway ... By whom?

Bob
Deconstructing conventional wisdom since the birth of punk

User avatar
Made Of Worms
Sea Nympho
Posts: 4657
Joined: Sun Aug 27, 2006 21:31

Postby Made Of Worms » Thu Sep 26, 2013 23:46

For a debut novel by an actor, The Late Hector Kipling is very good. Very funny about art and pretension and the selfish gene and death.

User avatar
Snardbafulator
Cardiacs Expert
Posts: 1807
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 23:22
Location: A little house by the Whole World Window

Re:

Postby Snardbafulator » Fri Sep 27, 2013 20:55

Made Of Worms wrote:For a debut novel by an actor, The Late Hector Kipling is very good. Very funny about art and pretension and the selfish gene and death.

FWIW, here's The Guardian's review. Greenland claims that it offers little of "the existential tumescence of nihilism."

Holy Michiko Kakutani, BatBloke!

Bob
Deconstructing conventional wisdom since the birth of punk

Batesy
"Dirty Boy Batesy"
Posts: 2284
Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 11:38

Re: What you Reading at the mo?

Postby Batesy » Wed Oct 16, 2013 14:31

Snardbafulator wrote:I had no idea du Maurier wrote The Birds. The Hitchcock movie scared the crap out of me when I saw it on TV as a kid ...


Yeah, I've always found it surprising that she's behind that too. She also wrote Don't Look Now, the film version of which always spooked me. Both are short stories and well worth a read. Her short story collections are excellent actually - one of which in particular, 'The Old Man', I absolutely love. I've read it again and again and the twist always moves me...

At the other end of the spectrum, I just finished reading Tony Fletcher's 'There is a Light That Never Goes Out: The Enduring Story of the Smiths'. As a faded Smiths/Morrissey fan, I totally lapped this up - a really pacey pop history told fairly objectively (i.e. it's not too much fawning over the legacy) that has left me revisiting all those old tunes and listening to them with fresh ears. It's a shame Morrissey and Andy Rourke didn't contribute but Johnny Marr, Mike Joyce and a host of others did which really gives it a lot of credence.

Looking forward to Morrissey's autobiography now even though I fully expect to be frustrated, maddened and bemused by it. I'll be in a bookshop at 9am tomorrow though - can't remember the last time I did that.

User avatar
schlep
Cardiacsy
Posts: 4650
Joined: Tue Sep 12, 2006 14:07
Location: a shed in Richmond

Re: What you Reading at the mo?

Postby schlep » Wed Oct 16, 2013 19:32

Just finished '2312' by Kim Stanley Robinson - very odd, entertaining sci-fi - of the old school, actual science gets into the mix with speculative fiction; I gather that the author has a grounding environmental science. The story is sort of incoherent - concerning a power struggle at a pivotal moment of solar system colonization - but the characters and settings are very interesting and dare I say, mind-blowing...an author I plan to check out again, soon.

Right now getting stuck into "The Dinosaur Heresies" - written and illustrated by Robert Bakker, in 1986. I have literally been carrying this book around with me for 25-odd years, meaning to read it before the next great extinction. I guess we're all pretty used to the controversial theory now, that dinosaurs may have been warm-blooded, and sported feathers.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dinosaur_Heresies

and reading poems out of 'Ariel' by Sylvia Plath, something Timmmy Smith was inspired by while writing the lyrics for the "Heaven Born..." album, someone said...
Do you know what I mean to say

I meant to say to you today

A day goes by I try thats why

I try to speak to you today

User avatar
Snardbafulator
Cardiacs Expert
Posts: 1807
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 23:22
Location: A little house by the Whole World Window

Re: What you Reading at the mo?

Postby Snardbafulator » Wed Oct 16, 2013 21:23

Batesy wrote:
Snardbafulator wrote:I had no idea du Maurier wrote The Birds. The Hitchcock movie scared the crap out of me when I saw it on TV as a kid ...

Yeah, I've always found it surprising that she's behind that too. She also wrote Don't Look Now, the film version of which always spooked me. Both are short stories and well worth a read. Her short story collections are excellent actually - one of which in particular, 'The Old Man', I absolutely love. I've read it again and again and the twist always moves me...

According to her Wikipedia article, she did have a thing for psychological menace, if not quite out-and-out Gothic terror. My Cousin Rachel is a pretty dark story of a supposed female usurper of a country estate who dies tragically and turns out to have been (probably) innocent of all the gnarly suspicions the family started to assume because of her foreign associations.
At the other end of the spectrum, I just finished reading Tony Fletcher's 'There is a Light That Never Goes Out: The Enduring Story of the Smiths'. As a faded Smiths/Morrissey fan, I totally lapped this up - a really pacey pop history told fairly objectively (i.e. it's not too much fawning over the legacy) that has left me revisiting all those old tunes and listening to them with fresh ears. It's a shame Morrissey and Andy Rourke didn't contribute but Johnny Marr, Mike Joyce and a host of others did which really gives it a lot of credence.

Yeah, you really have to be at a remove from the era for those histories to avoid becoming hagiographies, and I guess the 80s are pretty distant right now :eeeek: I've read both Shout! and The Love You Make because I'm fascinated by the social history of The Beatles, and also with how two guys without extensive musical training wound up revolutionizing pop music in a way that can't be reduced to gimmicks. Nobody wants to get too near that question, though, because that's the Beatles "magic" and we as a culture don't want to see it unpacked.

The one fiction book inspired by a musical scene I'm interested in picking up is The Rotters Club by Jonathan Coe. Although it's not really about Hatfield and the North, it is about the grandiose musical dreams of that era and the English boarding school milieu that fed them.
Looking forward to Morrissey's autobiography now even though I fully expect to be frustrated, maddened and bemused by it. I'll be in a bookshop at 9am tomorrow though - can't remember the last time I did that.

It couldn't possibly be more wince-inducing than Miles Davis's autobiography, but if it's even close, you'll probably give those closest to you cause to fear for your sanity as they catch you stridently lecturing a room in which you and the book are the only occupants ...

Bob
Deconstructing conventional wisdom since the birth of punk

User avatar
Snardbafulator
Cardiacs Expert
Posts: 1807
Joined: Mon Nov 08, 2010 23:22
Location: A little house by the Whole World Window

Re: What you Reading at the mo?

Postby Snardbafulator » Wed Oct 16, 2013 21:29

schlep wrote:and reading poems out of 'Ariel' by Sylvia Plath, something Timmmy Smith was inspired by while writing the lyrics for the "Heaven Born..." album, someone said...

Did you run into one called Cut, by any chance? I can't remember where that Plath poem came from, but I (sort of) set the first verse to music, and you can hear me reciting it (because I surely cannot sing a note) in the McClintic Sphere tune of that name on YouTube.

Bob
Deconstructing conventional wisdom since the birth of punk